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Anal fissure the pain associated with an anal fissure is typically located at the opening of the anus and is acute and sharp. The pain is experienced during a bowel movement but may persist over time. You may also experience anal itching as well as see bright red blood on the outside of the stool or on your toilet paper. Anal pain pain in and around your anus or rectum (perianal region) is a common complaint. Although most causes of anal pain are benign, the pain itself can be severe because of the many nerve endings in the perianal region. Many conditions that cause anal pain may also cause rectal bleeding, which is usually more frightening than serious. Anal fissure (a small tear in the lining of the anal canal) anal itching (pruritus ani) anal sex anorectal fistula (an abnormal channel between the anus or rectum usually to the skin near the anus) coccydynia or coccygodynia (tailbone pain) constipation crohns disease (a type of inflammatory bowel disease) diarrhea causing anal irritation. Most anal fissures will heal with treatment, although they can happen again easily, particularly if you dont follow the self-help advice outlined below. Self-help there are a number of self-help measures your gp may recommend to relieve constipation and reduce the pain caused by anal fissures. Anal pain (pain in the bottom) can be distressing, but its often just the result of a minor, treatable problem. The medical name for pain in and around the anus or rectum is proctalgia. An anal fissure is a small tear in the skin of the anus that can be caused by passing a large or hard poo. Information about causes of rectal pain such as anal fissures, hemorrhoids, proctalgia fugax, bleeding, and levator ani syndrome. Proctalgia fugax is normally diagnosed after other possible causes of anal pain and spasms have been ruled out. An anal fissure is a small tear or crack in the lining of the anus. If you experience severe pain or bright red bleeding during or after bowel movements, you may have an anal fissure.